The Japanese Bridal Bouquet

Japanese wedding

The Japanese Bridal Bouquet

One of a woman’s daydreams since she was a child is her own day wedding. Imagine yourself in the classic White dress , or with a particular dress, which follows a theme, imagine organizing everything, give him invitations, ai flowers , to the photographer and al restaurant is one of the recurring thoughts for future brides. Of all the decisions to be made, perhaps the most important for future bridesmaids, is choosing the outfit for their wedding day. Dress, accessories, shoes and of course, the bouquet .

Marriage: to each country its custom

Each country has its own traditions and beliefs. In some countries it is customary to wear a great-grandmother’s dress, obviously modified and adapted to the present moment.

In Italy, for example, the most disparate flowers are used for bridal bouquet , starting with the very classics Orange flowers and then end up with rarer and more particular flowers like the slipper of venus , part of the family of orchids.

A particular wedding: the Japanese one

Today we will focus on traditional Japanese wedding and in particular on the japanese wedding bouquet . Again, we will talk about the traditional wedding, because the modern one is a whole other story.

In many respects the East, and more particularly the Japan it has very strict rules on how the Japanese bride and groom’s dress should be and related accessories.

Japan is synonymous with precision and accuracy, cleanliness and methodicality, all qualities that are enclosed in bridal bouquet used in Japan , indeed it must be said when it’s used; in fact have the bouquet is optional . It is considered more of an accessory for the bride than wearing a white kimono , represents a blank canvas that the husband must complete, so the bouquet may or may not be part of this completion by the future husband.

The Japanese Bride

The Japanese bride is a work of art that is given to the groom as a wedding gift. In Japan there is also a lot of emphasis on colors and on forms. And the Japanese bouquet , when used, it must respect certain fees. Many brides opt for a small one handbag instead of the actual bouquet, together umbrella coordinated.

 

fan-shaped bride bouquet

The Japanese Bridal Bouquet

In most cases the japanese wedding bouquet it is spherical in shape, a shape that recalls perfection. It can be made with fresh flowers, but especially with flowers hand made , precisely of cloth you hate paper, embroidered in detail to simulate real flowers. How a bouquet is made also depends on how much you can spend.

Another type of Japanese tradition bouquet is always spherical in shape but made up of bamboo strands . Precisely when bamboo canes are still fresh, they are reduced into many thin strips that being still green are easier to work with. These strips are intertwined to form one ball which is left to dry and then decorated with flowers is tapes.

The spherical shape of the Japanese bridal bouquet

ball-wedding-bouquet

But why is the spherical shape more used for bridal bouquets in Japan? The circle symbolizes uninterrupted continuity , so it is a good omen for the newlyweds. In addition, the bride needs the hands free to open the umbrella or fan and the spherical shape of the bouquet helps in this; is held with a lanyard on the wrist .

Another Japanese-style bouquet has the shape of folding fan. The flowers are placed on a skeleton of a fan so as to create a very original and not very practical fan bouquet, just as that bouquet made with paper flowers that recall the ancient art origami.

The flowers most used in Japan for weddings and in general for festive occasions are the chrysanthemums. Unlike our country where flowers for the dead are considered, in Japan they are synonymous with eternity and therefore perfect for a wedding.

We just have to admire these splendid bouquets and, why not, use it at our wedding and distinguish ourselves from all other brides.

 

WOULD YOU LIKE TO ORGANIZE YOUR “JAPAN” THEMED WEDDING? LET’S DESIGN YOUR BOUQUET TOGETHER

 

credit photo cover: unadonna.it

credit photo fan bouquet: wedding.com

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